John Creuzot in the news

"Texas Court Aims to DIVERT First-Time Offenders"
August 15, 2008, NPR Morning Edition

EXCERPT:

Creuzot says what's different about DIVERT Court is the intense judicial oversight. "A person who relapses on drugs needs further treatment. Our responses are research-driven," he says. The statistics back him up. Two studies by Southern Methodist University show that DIVERT Court cuts the recidivism rate by 68 percent over the regular Texas criminal justice courts. For every dollar spent on the court, $9 are saved in future criminal justice costs.

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"The Power of Drug Courts"
November 23, 2007, Texas Observer

EXCERPT:

In the last 10 years, District Judge John Creuzot has molded Dallas County’s drug court into one of the most extensive and successful diversion programs in the state. (Watts referred to him as the drug court “granddaddy.”) In Dallas, addicts receive a clinical assessment when they enter the program to determine the kind of treatment they need, including mental health assistance. Many drug courts attempt to treat the root of the defendant’s addiction. But with the ability to refer addicts to a wider range of treatment facilities, Dallas may have the model program. The essential element that such courts must share, Creuzot says, is that treatment cannot work unless a judge connects with an addict."

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"John Creuzot The Problem Solver"
September 2, 2016, Attorney At Law Magazine

EXCERPT

Creuzot discovered that presiding as a judge was a genuine learning experience. “I enjoyed the trials and the challenge of the trials and watching the lawyers do their work. I watched very good lawyers and was able to learn from them. And when I say learned from them, I never had the attitude that I owned that court, that it was my court and I had some kind of right to it. I looked at it as a four-year lease subject to election. I never knew if I was going to prevail in the next election or not. So I treated it as a learning experience, as an opportunity to assist the lawyers in getting the cases moved and the problems solved.”

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"Phoenix House's Triumph For Teens Honors John Creuzot's Leadership in Dallas Court System's Drug Assessment Programs"
May 20, 2013, My Sweet Charity

EXCERPT

Then Creuzot and four young people took their places in chairs on the stage. Two were teenagers dealing with the early stages of drug abuse and peer pressure. The other two were veterans of the judicial and penal systems. These latter two discussed with the former judge how during their earlier incarcerations in San Antonio and Colorado, no assessment had been made of their drug abuse. Time and again they got out of prison only to go back to old habits. That was not the case when they confronted the Dallas judicial program, where an assessment is made of criminals allowing for rehabilitation. Had they been assessed during their first arrests, they might have never been trapped in an ongoing cycle without hope of solution.

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"Two Dallas Men Look to Officially Clear Their Names"
October 27, 2015, CW33

EXCERPT

Attorneys with the Innocence Project, an organization that assists prisoners in proving their innocence, are seeking a new trial based on DNA evidence. They're also challenging witness testimony from jailhouse informants.

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"The Policy and Politics of Drug Sentencing"
May 5, 2013, Texas Monthly

EXCERPT

In that hearing, Judge Creuzot cited extensive behavioral and economic research and said, “All the research shows that this approach reduces recidivism, reduces victimization, and costs less. That’s not a liberal position. It’s not a conservative position.

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"Man Freed After Three Decades in Prison"
January 4, 2012, Dallas Morning News

EXCERPT

His pleas for help were answered Wednesday when state District Judge John Creuzot freed Wyatt. His attorneys with the Innocence Project in New York discovered that evidence withheld in his case likely would have acquitted him.

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"A 12th Dallas Convict Is Exonerated by DNA"
January 18, 2007, The New York Times

EXCERPT

The judge, John C. Creuzot of Criminal District Court, sought to console Mr. Waller, who stood before him in a tan suit, a white shirt and a tie. “A lot of times we are tested in life, and you certainly had a terrible test,” Judge Creuzot said. “On behalf of any and all public officials at that time, I want to apologize.”

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"Judge Takes Personal Role in DNA Exoneration"
January 4, 2008, The Wall Street Journal

EXCERPT

“He’s my fourth one,” Judge Creuzot told the Times, meaning the fourth wrongly convicted prisoner he has freed. After inviting Chatman to the courtroom where his exoneration was announced, Judge Creuzot said he bought Chatman lunch. He also told the NYT that he had to teach him how to use a knife to cut his T-bone steak because he was only allowed spoons in prison. The judge said he later showed him his first cell phone and helped him call his family.

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"Charles Chatman released – 15th person to be cleared by DNA evidence in Dallas"
January 3, 2008, The Innocence Project

EXCERPT

Chatman was convicted of a 1981 rape after he was misidentified in a photo lineup. His attorney, Michelle Moore (who was co-counsel with the Innocence Project of Texas on the case), credited Texas judge John Creuzot with pushing for DNA testing in the case. Creuzot said he became convinced of Chatman’s innocence after presiding over two previous hearings in the case.

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